Nicholas Ryder

Professor in Financial Crime, University of West England

Nicholas’s current area of research the financing of terrorism. He has published four monographs including The Financial War on Terror: a review of counter-terrorist financing strategies since 2001; The financial crisis and white collar crime: The perfect storm?; Money laundering an endless cycle? and Financial Crime in the 21st Century – Law and Policy. He has also published two text books The Law Relating to Financial Crime in the United Kingdom and Commercial Law: Principles and Policy and an edited collection Fighting Financial Crime in the Global Economic Crisis.

Nicholas is the series founder and editor for Routledge’s The Law Relating to Financial Crime. His research has been sponsored by the City of London Police Force, ICT Wilmington Risk & Compliance, Universities South West, France Telecom Group and the European Social Fund.

Personal webpage

Project information

CREST’s work is structured by five Programmes of activity. You can find out more information about our core programmes, as well as our commissioned projects here.

Nicholas Ryder is part of the Understanding And Countering Online Behaviour programme. Read more about this project here.

Recent publications

Ryder, N. (2015) The Financial War on Terror: A review of counter-terrorist financing strategies since 2001. London: Routledge.
Ryder, N. (2014) The Financial Crisis and White Collar Crime: The Perfect Storm?. Edward Elgar.
Ryder, N., Harrison, K. (2013) The Law Relating to Financial Crime in the United Kingdom. Aldershot: Ashgate.
Ryder, N., Broomfield, K. (2014) ‘Predatory lending and white collar crime: a critical reflection’. International Company and Commercial Law Review, 25(9), 287-293.
Ryder, N., Turksen, U. (2013) ‘Banks in Defense of the Homeland: Nexus of Ethics and Suspicious Activity Reporting’. Contemporary Issues in Law (Special Issue on Law, Ethics and Counter-Terrorism), 12(4), 311-347.
Ryder, N. (2013) ‘To confiscate or not to confiscate? A comparative analysis of the confiscation of the proceeds of crime legislation in the United States of America and the United Kingdom’, Journal of Business Law, 8, 767-798.
Ryder, N. (2012) Money laundering an endless cycle? A comparative analysis of the anti-money laundering policies in the USA, UK, Australia and Canada. London: Routledge.
Ryder, N. (2011) ‘The fight against illicit finance – a critical review of the Labour government’s policy’, Journal of Banking Regulation, 12(3) 252-275.
Ryder, N., Hache, A. (2011) ‘Tis the season to (be jolly?) wise-up to online fraudsters Criminals on the web lurking to scam shoppers this Christmas – A critical analysis of the United Kingdom’s legislative provisions and policies to tackle online fraud’, Information and Communications Technology Law, 20(1) 35-56.
Ryder, N., Turksen, U. (2009) ‘Islamophobia or an important weapon? An analysis of the US financial war on terrorism’, Journal of Banking Regulation 10(4) 307-320.


More from Nic…

 

Out with the Old and … In with the Old? A Critical Review of the Financial War on Terrorism on the Islamic State of Iraq and Levant

This article critically considers the effectiveness of the ‘Financial War on Terrorism’ on the funding streams of the Islamic State of Iraq and Levant...Read More »

The Law Relating to Financial Crime in the United Kingdom

Outlining the different types of financial crime and its impact, this book is a user-friendly, up-to-date guide to the regulatory processes, systems and legislation...Read More »

Is there something missing? Terror finances and the UK review of economic crime

CREST Researcher Nicholas Ryder analyses aspects of the Cabinet Office review of the UK’s responses to economic crime, asking what impact this could have...Read More »

The Criminal Finances Bill

In October 2016, the UK Conservative Government published the Criminal Finances Bill, which represents the most comprehensive legislative attempt to tackle financial crime. CREST...Read More »

Funding streams for Islamic State - how the financial war on terror is no longer fit for purpose

How is the Islamic State funded and why are financial measures against them not working? In this webinar CREST researcher Professor Nic Ryder discusses...Read More »

Where does the Islamic State get its money?

The Islamic State has emerged as the largest and perhaps wealthiest terrorist group in the World. CREST researcher Nicholas Ryder identifies the funding streams...Read More »

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