Feni Kontogianni

Research Associate, University of Portsmouth

Feni is a research associate in the Psychology Department at the University of Portsmouth. Her work is focused on eliciting information in time-critical contexts. She previously completed her CREST-funded PhD at the University of Portsmouth, supervised by Professor Lorraine Hope, Professor Paul Taylor, and Professor Aldert Vrij as part of the Information Elicitation programme.

She is primarily interested in the use of memory-enhancing techniques and in the effects that cognitive and social factors have on interviewing and reporting. During her PhD she used an experimental approach to test the effectiveness of mnemonics and reporting formats to facilitate retrieval for complex witnessed events.

Recent Publications

  • Hope, L., Kontogianni, F., Geyer, K., & Thomas, W. (2019). Development of the Reporting Information about Networks and Groups (RING) task: a method for eliciting information from memory about associates, groups, and networks. Journal of Forensic Practice.
  • Hope, L., Gabbert, F., Kinninger, M., Kontogianni, F., Bracey, A., & Hanger, A. (2019). Who said what and when? A timeline approach to eliciting information and intelligence about conversations, plots, and plans. Law and human behavior. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/lhb0000329
  • Kontogianni, F. (2018). Eliciting information from cooperative sources about single & repeated multi-actor events (Doctoral dissertation, The University of Portsmouth).
  • Kontogianni, F., Hope, L., Taylor, P. J., Vrij, A., & Gabbert, F. (2018). The benefits of a self-generated cue mnemonic for timeline interviewing. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 7(3), 454-461. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jarmac.2018.03.006

More from Feni…

“Tell me more about this…”: An examination of the efficacy of follow-up open questions following an initial account

In information gathering interviews, follow‐up questions are asked to clarify and extend initial witness accounts. Across two experiments, we examined the efficacy of open‐ended...Read More »

The effectiveness of information elicitation techniques is the subject of our first Doctoral Thesis Overview - a brand new CREST resource.

The effectiveness of information elicitation techniques is the subject of our first Doctoral Thesis Overview – a brand new CREST resource. CREST has produced...Read More »

Eliciting information from cooperative sources about single & repeated multi-actor events

Feni Konotignni’s doctoral research examines the effectiveness of eliciting information from cooperative sources about single and repeated multi-actor events. Successful investigations in forensic and...Read More »

Using self-generated cues to elicit information

A guide to the Self-Generated Cues Technique, which can aid in the recall of information. Self-generated cues are details that are actively generated by...Read More »

The Self-Generated Cues Technique

A new CREST guide published today provides detail on the Self-Generated Cues Technique, which can aid in the recall of information. Successful investigations in...Read More »

Untangling the past: remembering details of repeated events

If you only attended one meeting of a terror cell, it might be easier to remember who said what than if you attended several....Read More »

The Benefits of a Self-Generated Cue Mnemonic for Timeline Interviewing

Reliable information is critical for investigations in forensic and security settings; however, obtaining reliable information for complex events can be challenging. In this study,...Read More »

Eliciting Information

Eliciting Information: A Multi-Modal Format for use with Cooperative Sources by CREST doctoral researcher Feni Kontogianni. This poster presents Kontogianni’s research on techniques that...Read More »

The Benefits of a Self-Generated Cue Mnemonic for Timeline Interviewing

The Benefits of a Self-Generated Cue Mnemonic for Timeline InterviewingThe Benefits of a Self-Generated Cue Mnemonic for Timeline Interviewing by CREST Doctoral Researcher Feni Kontogianni. Kontogianni’s poster gives an overview of her research...Read More »

Memory recall: The challenge of eliciting reliable information

Eliciting reliable and detailed information is a crucial element of intelligence gathering. There is a rich seam of psychological research on eyewitness memory and...Read More »

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