Community Reporting Thresholds: Full Report

community reporting thresholds full report

This is the full report on Community Reporting Thresholds, produced by CREST. It looks at the reporting of potential violent extremism and terrorism, focusing on identifying triggers, thresholds and barriers which may stop someone from reporting.

The first people to suspect or know about someone becoming involved in planning acts of violent extremism will often be those closest to them: their friends, family and community insiders. However, despite these ‘intimates’ having a vital role to play against potential terrorist threats, very little is known about the views and experiences of those who would potentially report their valuable information.

This Community Reporting Thresholds research project, built on an initial Australian study, has developed a new, localised and contextually-sensitive understanding and approach to community reporting issues in the UK context.

Key findings are that community members are primarily motivated by care and concern for their intimate in considering reporting. The gravity of reporting to the police means that most community respondents would only report after a staged process, whereby they first attempt to dissuade the intimate, and also take counsel and guidance from family members, friends and trusted ‘community leaders’.

Community respondents want to report to local police, not CT specialists, and to do so by face to face means. They also want support and updates after reporting through a feedback loop. Some respondents are unsure how to report, a perspective echoed by professional practitioners who see national reporting mechanisms as confusing and made more difficult by the public image of Prevent. These findings have enabled identification in the Final Report and the Executive Summary of clear strategic directions for future policy and practice consideration.

This report details the full study including key findings and conclusions of the research, for both community respondents and professional practitioners. It also includes future considerations for policy and practice. For a summary of this read the executive summary here.

17-18-01The full report can be downloaded for free here 17-018-01.pdf. To read the executive summary click here.

This report is by CREST researchers Professor Paul Thomas, Professor Michele Grossman, Dr Shamim Miah and Kris Christmann.

This report is produced under a Creative Commons 4.0 BY-NC-SA licence. For more information on how you can use our content read our copyright page.